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 The NACTO Urban Design Guide Webinars


   
TITLE: THE NACTO URBAN STREET DESIGN GUIDE: CHANGING THE DNA OF CITY STREETS----------- Registration closed.
DATE: Tuesday, January 28, 2014
TIME:  3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Eastern
SITE FEE: $75 ITE Individual Member/ $100 Non-member Individual Fee (Per person rate)
$125 ITE Member Group/$150 Non-member Group Fee (Per site fee for training of 4 or more people at one site)
EARNING COURSE CREDIT:  The site registration includes one complimentary evaluation for site registrant.  Attendees must enroll online using their ITE ID after the briefing to get access to the free post-webinar evaluation for course credit.  Further instructions will be sent after the Webinar to the site registrant to distribute their site attendees. The enrollment and the evaluation is name specific and non-transferable. Further instructions will be sent after the Webinar to the site registrant to distribute to their site attendees. If you or your attendee do not have an ITE login and password, get one now.
CREDIT: 1.5 PDH/ 2 IACET CEU/1.5 CM
BACKGROUND:

Streets comprise more than 80% of public space in cities, but they often fail to provide their surrounding communities with a space where people can safely walk, bicycle, drive, take transit, and socialize. A well-illustrated, concrete vision for the future of city streets, the Urban Street Design Guide charts the principles and practices of the nation’s foremost engineers, planners, and designers working in cities today. The Guide offers a blueprint for designing 21st century streets, and unveils the toolbox and the tactics cities use to make streets safer, more livable, and more economically vibrant.

Hear from leading experts in street design who contributed to the guide's development. This webinar will address how this resource will change the face of our nation's streets, the ways you can use it in your community, and how specific topics and elements in the document differ from conventional practice.

It should be noted that the content of this report is not endorsed by ITE and some treatments are not directly referenced in the current versions of the AASHTO Guide to Bikeway Facilities or the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The Federal Highway Administration has recently posted information regarding interim approval status of various bicycle related treatments not covered in the MUTCD. As such, ITE has pledged to work with NACTO and others to refine and integrate these emerging principles and practices into the state of the practice for transportation planning and engineering by including them in the standards and references of the profession.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the conclusion of the course, participants should be able to:

1) Recognize how and why city streets demand a unique set of design tools specific to their peculiar needs and characteristics.
2) Implement different "interim" design strategies, including parklets, public plazas, and temporary safety improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians.
3) Reevaluate the use of specific design controls and their impacts in urban areas, including design speed, design hour, functional classification, and design vehicle.

INSTRUCTORS:



David Vega-Barachowitz, Director, Designing Cities Initiatives, NACTO, New York, NY, USA; Ryan Russo, Assistant Commissioner, New York City DOT, Traffic & Planning, New York, NY, USA; Jamie Parks, Complete Streets Program Manager, City of Oakland Public Works Department, Oakland, CA, USA; Gary Schatz, Assistant Director, City of Austin Transportation Department, Austin, TX, USA

Gary  Schatz, P.E., PTOE is an Assistant Director with the Austin Transportation Department and is
the city’s traffic engineer of record. Gary’s team is responsible for engineering,
installing, operating, and maintaining all traffic signals, school zone flashers,
traffic signs and pavement markings in the city.

Jamie Parks is a Senior Transportation Planner with the City of Oakland’s Public Works Agency, overseeing implementation of the City’s complete streets policy across a wide-range of transportation functions. Jamie brings experience in multimodal transportation planning, pedestrian and bicycle safety, traffic operations, project prioritization, and performance measurement. As part of his livable streets work in Oakland, Jamie is working to inventory and prioritize existing transportation system deficiencies, establish policies to guide future City transportation investment, and managing several corridor improvement projects.

David Vega-Barachowitz is the Director of the Designing Cities initiative at the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). At NACTO, he coordinates the the Designing Cities initiative and Cities for Cycling Project. In this role, he serves as project manager for the Urban Bikeway Design and Urban Street Design Guide, which have together laid a better blueprint for city streets in the United States. Since joining NACTO in 2011, David’s work has focused on design interventions that re-imagine the fabric of the American streetscape and challenge traditional metrics of urban design and transportation engineering.

   
TITLE: THE NACTO URBAN BIKEWAY DESIGN GUIDE: STATE OF THE PRACTICE SOLUTIONS FOR CITY STREETS------REGISTER NOW
DATE: Wednesday, January 29, 2014
TIME:  3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Eastern
SITE FEE: $75 ITE Individual Member/ $100 Non-member Individual Fee (Per person rate)
$125 ITE Member Group/$150 Non-member Group Fee (Per site fee for training of 4 or more people at one site)
EARNING COURSE CREDIT:  The site registration includes one complimentary evaluation for site registrant.  Attendees must enroll online using their ITE ID after the briefing to get access to the free post-webinar evaluation for course credit.  Further instructions will be sent after the Webinar to the site registrant to distribute their site attendees. The enrollment and the evaluation is name specific and non-transferable. Further instructions will be sent after the Webinar to the site registrant to distribute to their site attendees. If you or your attendee do not have an ITE login and password, get one now.
COURSE CREDIT: 1.5 PDH/.2 IACET CEU/1.5 CM
BACKGROUND:

This web briefing is being hosted by ITE in partnership with the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) in an effort to share alternative perspectives on the design of bicycle facilities.

Since its initial release in Spring 2011, the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide has instigated a new approach to designing for cyclists on city streets. The report was referenced in a recent FHWA policy memo, the Bike Guide is staged to be applied in more cities and more diverse contexts. Using the structure of the Guide, this webinar will provide a basic introduction to the guide's main principles and recommendations, providing direct comparison and case studies to real projects and scenarios from US cities.

It should be noted that the content of this report is not endorsed by ITE and some treatments are not directly referenced in the current versions of the AASHTO Guide to Bikeway Facilities or the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The Federal Highway Administration has recently posted information regarding interim approval status of various bicycle related treatments not covered in the MUTCD. As such, ITE has pledged to work with NACTO and others to refine and integrate these emerging principles and practices into the state of the practice for transportation planning and engineering by including them in the standards and references of the profession.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the conclusion of the course, participants should be able to:

1) Appreciate the state of the practice in bikeway design for urban areas.
2) Identify protected bike lanes, or cycle tracks, and other innovative design features.
3) Describe real world comparisons and case studies to materials in the Guide, presenting additional information on implementation, process, and other messaging for bicycle infrastructure projects.

INSTRUCTORS:









David Vega-Barachowitz, Director, Designing Cities Initiative, NACTO, New York, NY, USA; Robert Burchfield, P.E.,  City Traffic Engineer, City of Portland, Portland, OR, USA; Michael Sallaberry, Senior Transportation Engineer, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, San Francisco, CA, USA; Nathan Roseberry, CDOT Senior Bikeways Engineer, T.Y. Lin International, Chicago, IL, USA

 

Robert Burchfield has more than 28 years of experience in municipal traffic engineering. In addition to overseeing traffic operations and safety, Mr. Burchfield has managed several groundbreaking initiatives in the course of his career, including Portland's Bicycle Program, Safe Routes to School and Traffic Calming projects.  He is a member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers and The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP), who recognized him as the 2009 Professional of the Year (Public Sector).

Nathan Roseberry, P.E. is a Senior Transportation Engineer with the T.Y. Lin, and is a licensed engineer in the state of Illinois. He is on contract full time at the Chicago Department of Transportation as the Senior Bikeways Engineer. His education includes an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Iowa, as well as a Master’s Degree in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Iowa.
Nathan has been with the T.Y. Lin International for two years. Nathan has experience with urban street designs, focusing on safety and bicycle facilities. He has designed and reviewed the installation of over 50 miles of buffer and barrier protected bicycle lanes in the City of Chicago over the past two years. Prior to working with T,Y, Lin, Nathan was the Senior Transportation Engineer for the Village of Hoffman Estates, Illinois.


Mike Sallaberry is a certified traffic engineer in California and has been working with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency for 14 years. He started there as the traffic engineer for the Bicycle Program and became the Traffic Calming Program Manager prior to his current position as a Senior Engineer with the Livable Streets subdivision, which oversees the pedestrian, traffic calming, and bicycle projects for the city. His past work includes creating space for bikeways and pedestrian facilities through the use of road diets, leading the effort to standardize the shared roadway marking (the “sharrow”), and the creative development of projects in a densely populated city where space is at a premium. He has worked on most of the 50+ road diet projects implemented in San Francisco.

David Vega-Barachowitz is the Director of the Designing Cities initiative at the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). At NACTO, he coordinates the the Designing Cities initiative and Cities for Cycling Project. In this role, he serves as project manager for the Urban Bikeway Design and Urban Street Design Guide, which have together laid a better blueprint for city streets in the United States. Since joining NACTO in 2011, David’s work has focused on design interventions that re-imagine the fabric of the American streetscape and challenge traditional metrics of urban design and transportation engineering.


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